PAIN VERSUS FUNCTION

The difference between pain (effects) and function (clues to underlying causes).

 

PAIN:  Is the END EFFECT of an underlying pattern of dysfunction and usually occurs in the tissues which are stressed (overloaded , stretched or compressed).

The structures which are painful are simply stressed but may actually be functioning (i.e. coping) – at least until they have a ‘breakdown’ (at which point they may need emergency care to get them back to ‘coping’ once again).

BUT – WHAT IS CAUSING THE STRESS IN THE FIRST PLACE?  Why are the painful structures under load?  This is where function comes into play.

 

FUNCTION:  The answer to this “why” has more to do with other things going on in our lives.  Often elsewhere, being mentally, emotionally, energetically, environmentally, socially or nutritionally etc.

The physical effects often located in other or distant areas from the site of pain) – which are DYS-FUNCTIONAL (but not always symptomatic) placing load upon the symptomatic tissues, setting them by placing them under stress, or otherwise interfering with (slowing) the natural healing process.

Thus – the underlying PATTERNS of DYS-FUNCTION which are more important to identify address if we expect to achieve long lasting results from any treatment or self-healing work.

This has particular benefit in helping those with complicated and chronic health issues which I am passionate about.  In these cases there is always a lot more going on than merely the tissues causing pain.

 

 

Treating symptomatically is like mowing the lawns without pulling up the weeds – whereas identifying the underlying problem patterns is like noticing both the healthy and weedy areas and then pulling up the (primary) weeds (roots and all) and planting healthy seeds (or habits) in their place.

 

This means a person not only potentially clears their symptoms but they also improve long term inner well-being and health (by learning how to feed the flower of health and starve the weed of disease – so to speak and thus get healthier).

 

If anyone has any questions or wants to learn more on how to start the healing process please contact the clinic to find out more.

 

PAUL TURNER

OSTEOPATH, FERNY CREEK

 

http://www.turnerpublications.com/term-2-2011-message-issues-with-pain-range/

 

 

 

Mindfulness

Zen stones in water

Everyone is “colouring book” mad at the moment; they are everywhere and all sorts of publishers are releasing these books, from the beautiful designs in the bookstores to the weekly magazines. Do you know why that is? Mindfulness; It’s all the craze!

For those who don’t know what mindfulness is or how to practice it, we have put together some information and a few tips to start being mindful now!

Mindfulness is the practice of being in the moment, by keeping your mind in a state of active attention on the present. We often spend so much time thinking ahead and looking back, we forget to be present in the moment. Mindfulness is a practice to keep us there in the current. And this is why colouring has been such a craze. It makes us stop what we are doing and thinking and brings us right into the moment, focussing us on what we are doing.

How do you be mindful? Here are some tips to get started or press the restart button!

  1. Take a couple of minutes to notice your breathing. Sense the flow of the breath, the rise and fall of your belly
  1. Notice what you are doing as you are doing it and tune into your senses. When you are eating, notice the colour, texture and taste of the food.
  2. When you are walking, tune into how your weight shifts and the sensations in the bottom of your feet. Focus less on where you are headed.
  3. Don’t feel that you need to fill up all your time with doing. Take some time to simply be.
  4. When your mind wanders to thinking, gently bring it back to your breath.
  5. Recognize that thoughts are simply thoughts; you don’t need to believe them or react to them.
  6. Practice listening without making judgments.
  7. Notice where you tend to zone out (e.g., driving, emailing or texting, web surfing, feeding the dog, doing dishes, brushing teeth, etc.). Practice bringing more awareness to that activity.)
  8. Spend time in nature.
  9. Notice how the mind likes to constantly judge. Don’t take it seriously. It’s not who you are.